Modern Architecture in Charlotte

The Bechtler Museum of Modern Art in Charlotte, North Carolina, is a 36,500-square-foot museum space dedicated to the exhibition of mid-20th-century modern art. The architecture of the museum is modern too and stands out midst other buildings in uptown Charlotte.

Modern Architectural Lines

A Framed View

Charlotte – A Theater from a Church

The pride of Spirit Square is the 730-seat McGlohon Theater, named in honor of the late legendary jazz pianist Loonis McGlohon of Charlotte. With beautiful stained glass windows and a cupola, this space served as the First Baptist Church sanctuary for many years. The theater has been carefully restored to preserve and enhance its unique architectural details.

Charlotte – Inside McGlohon Theater at Spirit Square

Charlotte – Bechtler Museum of Modern Art

The Bechtler Museum of Modern Art in Charlotte, North Carolina, is a 36,500-square-foot museum space dedicated to the exhibition of mid-20th-century modern art. The museum is designed by Swiss architect Mario Botta. A key design element of the four-story structure is the soaring glass atrium that extends through the museum’s core and diffuses natural light throughout the building.

Charlotte – Bechtler Museum of Modern Art

Charlotte – Coming Together

Downtown Charlotte or Uptown (as it is usually called by locals) is home to a number of contemporary high-rise buildings and modern towers, as well as historic structures and old buildings.

Here is an image to bring a unique perspective combining the modern architectural elements of Charlotte.

Charlotte – Coming Together

Hunger Games Fame

A brief breath of life came back to Henry River Mill Village in 2012 by way of fame and fortune—Hollywood thought the run-down village would serve as the perfect setting for the post-apocalyptic dystopia District 12 featured in the film The Hunger Games. The town was featured in several scenes including the house below that served as the home of Katniss Everdeen.

Hunger Games Fame

Village Homes

The residential area of the Henry River Mill Village consisted of approximately 35 small worker’s cottages. Twenty-one are still standing today. These 1-1/2 story duplex houses were laid out along the steep contours of the river’s northern bank. The workers lived in two-family boarding houses or workers’ cottages built by the company, which were leased at nominal fees.

Built on a Slope

A Two Family Home

Homes from a Different Era

Henry River is an example of history that seems so distant, yet it can still be seen, touched and heard with our own eyes and ears.

Built as a planned community, the village was a self-contained complex with its own mill, dam, water and fire-protection systems, and company store. In later years the village gained amenities such as walkways, terraced green spaces, and field stone retaining walls.

Homes from a Different Era