Staircase to the Temple

The stone for the BAPS Temple in Atlanta, Georgia was shipped piece by piece from India, where craftsmen had sculptured it into more than 500 designs including rosettes, leaves, feathers and lacy geometric patterns. The thousands of sections, ranging from five ounces to five tons, each with its own bar code, have been assembled like a giant jigsaw puzzle based on instructions for religious buildings written into scripture thousands of years old.

Staircase to the Temple

BAPS Temple Atlanta Panorama

Open to one and all, the BAPS Shri Swaminarayan Mandir, in Atlanta, Georgia) was inaugurated in August of 2007 after only 17 months of construction time utilizing 1.3 million volunteer hours. The Mandir is comprised of three types of stone (Turkish Limestone, Italian marble, and Indian pink sandstone). More than 34,000 individual pieces were carved by hand in India, shipped to the USA and assembled like a giant 3-D puzzle.

BAPS Temple Atlanta Panorama

An Essential Item from the Past

Darbargadh Poshina has interesting artifacts from the past including this hand operated stone flour mill. Millstones or mill stones are stones used in gristmills, for grinding wheat or other grains. Millstones come in pairs – the runner stone spins above the stationary bedstone creating the “scissoring” or grinding action of the stones.

An Essential Item from the Past

Muchelney Abbey and Abbott’s House

Founded in 7th or 8th century, Muchelney Abbey is a landmark in Somerset. It was once a wealthy Benedictine house and the second oldest religious foundation in Somerset, but as part of the dissolution the abbey’s principal buildings were demolished by Henry VIII in 1538. The Abbey was the second largest in Somerset after Glastonbury, England.

Muchelney Abbey

The only intact structure is the Abbot’s House with well-preserved architectural features including external stonework and inside a great chamber with ornate fireplace, carved settle and stained glass, and timber roof.

Muchelney Abbey Abbott’s House

Machu Picchu – Stonework

Machu Picchu - Stonework

Machu Picchu – Stonework

The central buildings of Machu Picchu use the classical Inca architectural style of polished dry-stone walls of regular shape. The Incas were masters of this technique, called ashlar, in which blocks of stone are cut to fit together tightly without mortar. Many junctions in the central city are so perfect that it is said not even a blade of grass fits between the stones.