Old Architecture Homes in Savannah

More than 40 percent of the buildings and homes found in Savannah, Georgia have architectural or historical significance. The restoration of these structures is often undertaken by passionate individuals in strict accordance with the rules and regulations put forth by the Savannah Historic Foundation. Restoration of historic buildings has thrived here especially since the addition of the Savannah College of Art and Design in the late 1970s. 

Old Architecture Homes in Savannah

Cathedral Basilica of St John the Baptist in Savannah

The Cathedral Basilica of St. John the Baptist is an iconic symbol of Savannah, Georgia, gracing the skyline with its towering steeples. The church was dedicated on its current site on April 30, 1876. A fire in 1898 destroyed much of the structure. It was rebuilt quickly and re-opened in 1900. The Cathedral represents historically noteworthy architecture as well as over a century of faith and civic traditions in Savannah. 

Cathedral of St John the Baptist Savannah

Savannah – Chippewa Square

Chippewa Square in Savannah, Georgia was designed in 1815 and named to commemorate the Battle of Chippewa in the War of 1812. In the center stands a bronze statue of the colony’s founder, General James Edward Oglethorpe, who faces south protecting Savannah from the Spanish in Florida. The Eastman-Stoddard House is a 12,000 sq ft Greek Revival Mansion which overlooks Chippewa Square. Although construction of this Greek revival mansion was started in 1844 for Moses Eastman, a local silversmith, it was not completed until 1847 for John Stoddard. 

Chippewa Square is also known as Forrest Gump Square, where the bus stop scenes from the Oscar winning motion picture were filmed on the north end of the square.

Savannah – Chippewa Square

Savannah – Madison Square

Madison Square in Savannah, Georgia was designed in 1837 and named to honor James Madison, the fourth president of the United States. In the center stands a monument of Sergeant William Jasper who fell during the Siege of Savannah in 1779. The Green-Meldrim House was built in 1850 for cotton merchant Charles Green.  In 1892 the home was purchased by Judge Peter Meldrim whose heirs later sold it to St. John’s Episcopal Church (formed in 1841). The home’s amazing past includes a brief residency by General Sherman after he took the city in 1864.

Savannah – Madison Square

Savannah – Reynolds Square

Reynolds Square in Savannah, Georgia was designed in 1733 and named for Georgia’s first Royal Governor, John Reynolds. In the center stands a monument to John Wesley, the founder of Methodism and the Anglican minister to the colony in 1736. The Olde Pink House, Savannah’s only 18th century mansion, is famous for memorable dining experiences. The historic Lucas Theatre for the Arts built in 1921 was closed in 1976 and slated to be demolished, but preservation efforts led to the theater reopening in 2000. The theater, owned by the Savannah College of Art and Design, is the home venue for the Savannah Philharmonic Orchestra.

Savannah – Reynolds Square

Savannah’s Historic River District

River Street in Savannah, Georgia is a glittering, multi-faceted gem along the broad Savannah River. The century old buildings, once cotton warehouses, have been converted to antique shops, distinctive boutiques, spectacular galleries, quaint brew pubs, fabulous restaurants, unique nightspots, elegant inns and hotels. Cruising on a paddleboat under the Talmadge Memorial Bridge is an experience.

Savannah’s Historic River District

Postcards from Savannah

Posting a newer format to my blog – a postcard collage of images from Savannah.

Savannah, a coastal Georgia city, is separated from South Carolina by the Savannah River. It is known for manicured parks, horse-drawn carriages and antebellum (pre Civil War) architecture. Its historic district is filled with cobblestoned squares and parks

Savannah, Georgia

Mother and Student

The life-size statue Sisters of Mercy founder Mother Catherine McAuley standing next to a female student—uniquely adorned in the St. Vincent’s Academy cardigan sweater with Mercy shield—as a testament to the important role her order, the Sisters of Mercy, played in education in Savannah, Georgia.

Mother and Student

Swimming with the Little Fish

The Georgia Aquarium, located in Atlanta, is the largest aquarium in the western part of the world. Outside of Asia, this aquarium is the only institution housing whale sharks. The Aquarium’s other notable specimens include beluga whales, bottle-nose dolphins, and manta rays.

Swimming with the Little Fish

Staircase to the Temple

The stone for the BAPS Temple in Atlanta, Georgia was shipped piece by piece from India, where craftsmen had sculptured it into more than 500 designs including rosettes, leaves, feathers and lacy geometric patterns. The thousands of sections, ranging from five ounces to five tons, each with its own bar code, have been assembled like a giant jigsaw puzzle based on instructions for religious buildings written into scripture thousands of years old.

Staircase to the Temple

Row of Elephants at the Temple

The water feature at BAPS Temple in Atlanta, Georgia is decorated with a row of elephant sculptures.

In India the elephant is a symbol for power, dignity, intelligence and peace. Elephants in Hinduism and the Indian Culture are a symbol of intellectual strength, and sturdy earthy mental strength. Elephants, in general, symbolize the qualities of wisdom, strength, courage, longevity, patience, honor, and stature.

Row of Elephants at the Temple