Eyes of the Lanner Falcon

Outstandingly maneuverable, Lanner Falcons use their large tails and relatively low wing loading to perform exceptionally to the lure and can take a range of small birds as prey. The piercing eyes of a Lanner Falcon at the Carolina Raptor Center, North Carolina.

Eyes of a Lanner Falcon Male

Lanner Falcon Male Closeup

Lanner Falcon

The Lanner Falcon is a large bird of prey that breeds in Africa, southeast Europe and Asia and is a bird of open country and savanna. Males and females look alike, but the browner young birds resemble Saker Falcons even more. However, Sakers have a lighter top of the head and less clear head-side patterns. Here is a male Lanner Falcon in captivity at Carolina Raptor Center, North Carolina.

Lanner Falcon Male Perched on a Rock

Tethered Lanner Falcon Male

Broad-winged Hawk

A small, stocky raptor with black-and-white bands on the tail, the Broad-winged Hawk is a bird of the forest interior and can be hard to see during the nesting season. Its call is a piercing, two-parted whistle. Here is a captive male at the Carolina Raptor Center, Huntersville, North Carolina.

Broad-winged Hawk Male Looking at You

Broad-winged Hawk Male Looking Away

American Kestrel

 

The American Kestrel is the smallest falcon in North America, weighing 3-6 ounces. American Kestrels are one of only three raptor species in North America where males and females look very different from each other. Males have blue-hued wings and one black bar on their orange tail feathers; females have orange wings with black stripes and many black bars on their orange tail feathers.

Here is a female kestrel at Carolina Raptor Center.

American Kestrel Female

Barn Owl

With its ghostly appearance, rasping shrieks, and habit of roosting in such places as church belfries, the Barn Owl has attracted much superstition. However, it is really a good omen for farmers who find it in their barns, for it preys chiefly on mice and rats.

A female version on display at Carolina Raptor Center, Huntersville, North Carolina.

Barn Owl Female

Barn Owl Female Close Up

A Barred Owl Portrait

The Barred Owl is a nocturnal bird. It hides in dense foliage during the day, usually high up. May also roost on a branch close to a broad tree-trunk, or in a natural tree hole. May be very aggressive when defending a nest. Here is female version – perched at Carolina Raptor Center, North Carolina.

Barred Owl Female Perched

Female Barred Owl

The barred owl, also known as the northern barred owl, striped owl or, more informally, hoot owl, is a North American large species of owl. Here is a female barred owl at Carolina Raptor Center, Huntersville, North Carolina. Females are normally larger and heavier than males.

Barred Owl Female

Barred Owl Female Close Up

Birds at Carolina Raptor Center

Carolina Raptor Center (Huntersville, North Carolina) is a living museum, dedicated to the conservation of birds of prey. It is home to over 25 species of native and exotic raptors — hawks, falcons, eagles, merlins, kites and vultures.

Although in captivity, we got an opportunity to photograph some birds in their natural setting. Will be posting individual images of these magnificent birds over the next few weeks.

Birds at Carolina Raptor Center

Swings to View the Intracoastal

The Intracoastal Waterway runs all the way from Winyah Bay to Cape Fear River but really the Intracoastal Waterways run all up and down the East Coast. This 3,000 mile inland waterway consists of natural inlets, saltwater rivers, bays, sounds and canals. In Sunset Beach, the Intracoastal waterway splits the town in half. A nice park allows a peaceful view of the waterway.

Pair of Swings

A Quiet Swing by the Intracoastal