Prothonotary Warbler

This Prothonotary warbler looks like a bit of spring sunlight with its golden-yellow head and breast set off by blue-gray wings. “Prothonotary” refers to clerks in the Roman Catholic Church, whose robes were bright yellow. To a Prothonotary Warbler, a great breeding habitat features dead snags and trees full of holes, always near water—whether rivers, swamps, or bottomland forests. The Audubon Center at Beidler Forest, South Carolina is home to numerous Prothonotary warblers.

Prothonotary Warbler
Looking Up

Bewick’s Swan

The Bewick’s Swan is a sub-species of the native Tundra Swan seen in North America.  The Bewick’s swan is much smaller and has a shorter and straighter neck than the whooper and mute swan. The yellow shape on its beak is like a blob of butter, while a whooper swan’s seems like a wedge of cheese.

Here is Bewick’s Swan on abstract water ripples at Swan Lake Iris Gardens, Sumter, SC

Swan on Abstract Water Ripples

Distorted Reflections of a Trumpeter Swan

Gentle ripples distort the reflections of this Trumpeter Swan at Swan Lake Iris Gardens, Sumter, SC.

Trumpeter Swans are our biggest native waterfowl, stretching to 6 feet in length and weighing more than 25 pounds – almost twice as massive as a Tundra Swan. Getting airborne requires a lumbering takeoff along a 100-yard runway.

Distorted Reflections of a Trumpeter Swan