Large Standing Figure: Knife Edge by Henry Spencer Moore

This prolific sculptor made work in wood, stone, and bronze. As a student in London, Henry Moore absorbed the influences around him, both the work of his contemporaries and the pre-Columbian and ancient art in the British Museum. It is easy to see a connection between Large Standing Figure and ancient art. This sculpture is displayed at the North Carolina Museum of Art in Raleigh.

Large Standing Figure: Knife Edge by Henry Spencer Moore

Wind Sculpture II by Yinka Shonibare

Known for his figurative sculptures that use Dutch wax cloth (popular throughout Africa) to explore cultural identity, Yinka Shonibare here, at the North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh, transforms a wisp of the same fabric into a playfully monumental sculpture that captures the wind like a giant sail.

Wind Sculpture II by Yinka Shonibare

Askew by Roxy Paine

Askew, at North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh, is part of a series of works that Roxy Paine describes as “dendroids,” treelike forms with elaborate branching structures. His sculptures are inspired by real trees but never truthful depictions of actual species. The stainless steel surfaces of the work change dramatically with the light.

Askew by Roxy Paine

Crossroads/Trickster 1 by Martha Jackson-Jarvis

Placed at the threshold between the field and forest at North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh, Crossroads/Trickster I marks a transitional point from public to private, manmade to natural, open to enclosed. The sculpture by Martha Jackson-Jarvis combines brightly colored Italian glass tiles, carnelian stones, and shattered bricks (recycled from the Polk youth correctional facility, located on this property from 1920 to 1997).

Crossroads/Trickster 1 by Martha Jackson-Jarvis

Staircase to the Temple

The stone for the BAPS Temple in Atlanta, Georgia was shipped piece by piece from India, where craftsmen had sculptured it into more than 500 designs including rosettes, leaves, feathers and lacy geometric patterns. The thousands of sections, ranging from five ounces to five tons, each with its own bar code, have been assembled like a giant jigsaw puzzle based on instructions for religious buildings written into scripture thousands of years old.

Staircase to the Temple

An Antique Mahavira

An antique, intricate sculpture of Mahavira in India. Mahavira was born a little before the Buddha. While the Buddha was the founder of Buddhism, Mahavira did not establish Jainism, but gave the religion its present-day form. Mahavira, like the Buddha, was born as a prince but renounced his royal life at the age of 30 and became an ascetic.

An Antique Buddha

Nataraja

Nataraja is a depiction of the Hindu god Shiva as the divine dancer. The sculpture is symbolic of Shiva as the lord of dance and dramatic arts, with its style and proportions made according to Hindu texts on arts.

The dwarf (not a baby) under Nataraja’s feet is Apasmāra, which represents ‘tamas’; ignorance and nonsensical speech. Since then Lord Shiva is also known as ‘Hara’, which means destroyer of ‘Tamas’.

A statue of Nataraja at Shilparamam, Hyderabad …..

Nataraja

Nelson’s Ship in a Bottle by Yinka Shonibare

National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, London displays Nelson’s Ship in a Bottle by Yinka Shonibare, a 1:30 replica of Nelson’s flagship, HMS ‘Victory’ on which he died during the Battle of Trafalgar on 21 October 1805. It has 80 guns and 37 sails set as on the day of battle. The richly patterned sails were inspired by Indonesian batik, mass-produced by Dutch traders and sold in West Africa. The sculpture is 15.4 ft long and measures 7.7 ft from the keel to the top of the main mast.

Nelson’s Ship in a Bottle by Yinka Shonibare

Yinka Shonibare ‘Ship in a Bottle’

Charlotte – Metalmorphosis

Metalmorphosis, by Czech artist David Černýa, is a mirrored sculpture housed in the Whitehall Technology Park in Charlotte, North Carolina. The creation consists of nearly 40 steel pieces grouped into 7 segments which independently rotate 360 degrees. When the segments are aligned, the sculpture appears to be a giant, silver head with all of the usual fixtures in their regular places.

Charlotte – Metalmorphosis Face On

Charlotte – Firebird Sculpture

Affectionately known as “Disco Chicken” by area residents, the shimmering Firebird sculpture was installed in 2009, and stands at the entrance of the Bechtler Museum of Modern Art in Charlotte, North Carolina. The statue stands over 17 feet tall and weighs over 1,400 pounds. The entire statue is covered from top to bottom in over 7,500 pieces of mirrored and colored glass. The piece was created in 1991 by French-American artist Niki de Saint Phalle.

Charlotte – Firebird Sculpture