Yellowstone – Steam Rising

The landscape at Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming is populated by areas with volcanic activity causing flowing water to boil and create steam.

Heat and volcanic gases from slowly cooling magma rise and warm the dense salty water that occupies fractured rocks above the Yellowstone magma chamber. That brine, in turn, transfers its heat to overlying fresh groundwater which is recharged by rainfall and snowmelt from the surface.

A Steaming Stream
Steaming Down the Rocks
Steam Rising

Yellowstone Landscape

Yellowstone National Park is a nearly 3,500-sq.-mile wilderness recreation area atop a volcanic hot spot. Mostly in Wyoming, the park spreads into parts of Montana and Idaho too. Yellowstone features dramatic canyons, alpine rivers, lush forests, hot springs and gushing geysers, including its most famous, Old Faithful. It’s also home to hundreds of animal species, including bears, wolves, bison, elk and antelope. 

As we were visiting in Fall, the landscape in Yellowstone was drier but the vistas were still beautiful.

Yellowstone Landscape
Yellowstone Drying Landscape

Reflections – in Landscape

The wonderful thing about using reflections when taking photos is that they can completely alter the image from something fairly straightforward to something richer or abstract or otherwise more artistic. Here is a reflection of the landscape at sunset in a small body of water.

Reflections at Sunset

Bridge over Little Tennessee River

A wooden bridge over Little Tennessee River in Franklin, North Carolina. Meandering for five miles through some of the most beautiful natural landscape in Franklin, the Little Tennessee River Greenway is a community recreational green space. A long stretch of uninhabited land along the river has been beautifully utilized to provide a scenic walkway through several natural habitats including wetlands, pastures and upland woods. 

Bridge over Little Tennessee River
Leading to the Other Side