Cathedral Basilica of St John the Baptist in Savannah

The Cathedral Basilica of St. John the Baptist is an iconic symbol of Savannah, Georgia, gracing the skyline with its towering steeples. The church was dedicated on its current site on April 30, 1876. A fire in 1898 destroyed much of the structure. It was rebuilt quickly and re-opened in 1900. The Cathedral represents historically noteworthy architecture as well as over a century of faith and civic traditions in Savannah. 

Cathedral of St John the Baptist Savannah

Savannah – Chippewa Square

Chippewa Square in Savannah, Georgia was designed in 1815 and named to commemorate the Battle of Chippewa in the War of 1812. In the center stands a bronze statue of the colony’s founder, General James Edward Oglethorpe, who faces south protecting Savannah from the Spanish in Florida. The Eastman-Stoddard House is a 12,000 sq ft Greek Revival Mansion which overlooks Chippewa Square. Although construction of this Greek revival mansion was started in 1844 for Moses Eastman, a local silversmith, it was not completed until 1847 for John Stoddard. 

Chippewa Square is also known as Forrest Gump Square, where the bus stop scenes from the Oscar winning motion picture were filmed on the north end of the square.

Savannah – Chippewa Square

Savannah – Madison Square

Madison Square in Savannah, Georgia was designed in 1837 and named to honor James Madison, the fourth president of the United States. In the center stands a monument of Sergeant William Jasper who fell during the Siege of Savannah in 1779. The Green-Meldrim House was built in 1850 for cotton merchant Charles Green.  In 1892 the home was purchased by Judge Peter Meldrim whose heirs later sold it to St. John’s Episcopal Church (formed in 1841). The home’s amazing past includes a brief residency by General Sherman after he took the city in 1864.

Savannah – Madison Square

Savannah – Reynolds Square

Reynolds Square in Savannah, Georgia was designed in 1733 and named for Georgia’s first Royal Governor, John Reynolds. In the center stands a monument to John Wesley, the founder of Methodism and the Anglican minister to the colony in 1736. The Olde Pink House, Savannah’s only 18th century mansion, is famous for memorable dining experiences. The historic Lucas Theatre for the Arts built in 1921 was closed in 1976 and slated to be demolished, but preservation efforts led to the theater reopening in 2000. The theater, owned by the Savannah College of Art and Design, is the home venue for the Savannah Philharmonic Orchestra.

Savannah – Reynolds Square

Savannah – Wright Square

The original four squares (Johnson, Wright, Ellis, Telfair) of Savannah date to 1733 and were a distinctive part of James Oglethorpe’s plan for the city. Eventually squares were located in the center of each of the city’s 24 neighborhoods or “wards.” Savannah’s remaining 22 squares are located across a one-square-mile area of downtown. Each square is typically 200 feet north to south and 100 to 300 feet east to west.

Wright Square was designed in 1733 and named for Sir James Wright, Georgia’s third and last colonial governor. The monument in the square honors William Washington Gordon, an early mayor of Savannah who established the Central of Georgia Railroad. The large boulder marks the grave of Tomochichi, the Yamacraw Indian Chief who welcomed General Oglethorpe and the first colonists.

Savannah – Wright Square

Savannah City Hall

Opened on January 2, 1906, City Hall is the first building constructed by the citizens of Savannah expressly and exclusively to serve as the seat of municipal government. A spectacular architectural masterpiece, City Hall features a domed roof that rises 70 feet into the air. It was originally made in copper but was gilded in 1987 with sheets of 23-karat gold leaf.

Savannah City Hall

Savannah’s Historic River District

River Street in Savannah, Georgia is a glittering, multi-faceted gem along the broad Savannah River. The century old buildings, once cotton warehouses, have been converted to antique shops, distinctive boutiques, spectacular galleries, quaint brew pubs, fabulous restaurants, unique nightspots, elegant inns and hotels. Cruising on a paddleboat under the Talmadge Memorial Bridge is an experience.

Savannah’s Historic River District

Postcards from Savannah

Posting a newer format to my blog – a postcard collage of images from Savannah.

Savannah, a coastal Georgia city, is separated from South Carolina by the Savannah River. It is known for manicured parks, horse-drawn carriages and antebellum (pre Civil War) architecture. Its historic district is filled with cobblestoned squares and parks

Savannah, Georgia

What is a Zonkey?

A “zonkey” is a hybrid cross produced by mating a zebra and a donkey. Zonkeys are not a true species because they have an odd number of chromosomes and cannot reproduce. While zonkeys are rare, they are bred in a number of zoos and specialized farms around the world.

Here is a zonkey at Catawba Farms in Newton, North Carolina. It doesn’t seem to look either like a donkey or a zebra!

Zonkey