Yellowstone – Rainbows at Old Faithful

The vapor of Old Faithful’s eruption at Yellowstone and a bright sun form a rainbow further beautifying the world famous geyser. There is an illusion of two rainbows in the first image – one in the geyser and another one against the blue sky.

Rainbows at Old Faithful
Rainbow at Old Faithful

Yellowstone – Colorful Prismatic

The iconic image of Yellowstone is an expansive spring with rainbow-like colors radiating from its center, dominated by a fiery orange hue at its edges. Though these dazzlingly painted hot springs seem fit only for picture books, their colors come from very real, and very earthly, microscopic creatures.

Hiding out in the park’s hot springs — where temperatures are high enough to blister your skin and as acidic as liquid in a car battery — are heat-loving microbes. And they’re thriving. Where you see rings of color, there are, most of the time, rings of different bacteria, each group adapted to the conditions, such as temperature and pH (how acidic a solution is) of their environments.

Prismatic Formations

Yellowstone – Grand Prismatic

Old Faithful may be more famous, but the Grand Prismatic Hot Spring is the most photographed thermal feature in Yellowstone. That’s because of its crazy-bright colors and enormous size. The Grand Prismatic Spring is the largest hot spring in the United States. Its colors match most of those seen in the rainbow dispersion of white light by an optical prism: red, orange, yellow, green, and blue

While we were there, steam covered the Grand Prismatic and did not reveal its brilliant colors, but adjoining springs were equally colorful and will be posted next.

Grand Prismatic Covered by Steam

Iguazu Falls – Another Rainbow

Iguazu Falls - Another Rainbow

Iguazu Falls – Another Rainbow

Waterfall rainbows are not even an especially rare phenomenon at Iguazu Falls, but they are spectacular. As if waterfalls were not extravagant enough, nature  goes and really creates a feast for the eyes by throwing in a rainbow for free.  Rampaging water, perennially worn rocks, and the seven colours of the spectrum just to top it all off.