Maine – Portland Head Lighthouse in Fog

Portland Head Light, is a historic lighthouse in Cape Elizabeth, Maine. The light station sits on a head of land at the entrance of the primary shipping channel into Portland Harbor, which is within Casco Bay in the Gulf of Maine. Completed in 1791, it is the oldest lighthouse in the state of Maine.

Maine – Portland Head Lighthouse in Fog

Maine – A Rainy, Foggy Day at Portland Head Lighthouse

Maine – Historic Bass Harbor Head Light Station

On January 21, 1988, the lighthouse was added to the National Register of Historic Places under the title of Bass Harbor Head Light Station and belongs to the U.S. Coast Guard.

The tower and lighthouse viewing area offers a vantage point to see a panoramic view of the harbor and the islands in the distance. This is easily one of the most, if not the most, photographed lighthouse in New England.

Maine – Bass Harbor Head Light

Maine – Bass Harbor Head Light B&W

Maine – Bass Harbor Head Lighthouse

The cliffside Bass Harbor Head Lighthouse in Acadia National Park, Maine  marks the entrance to Bass Harbor on the southwestern side of Mount Desert Island. The lighthouse, built of brick in 1858 on a stone foundation, stands 56 feet above high water.

The best view of this lighthouse is from the ocean, but this side view shows the treacherous rocks of the cliff.

Maine – Bass Harbor Head Light on the Rocks

Sunset Glow on Bodie Island Lighthouse

The current Bodie Island Lighthouse is the third that has stood in this vicinity of Bodie Island on the Outer Banks in North Carolina and was built in 1872. It stands 156 feet tall and is located on the Roanoke Sound side of the first island that is part of the Cape Hatteras National Seashore. The lighthouse is just south of Nags Head, a few miles before Oregon Inlet. It was renovated from August 2009 to March 2013, and was made climbable by the public. There are 214 steps that spiral to the top. The 170-foot structure is one of only a dozen remaining tall, brick tower lighthouses in the United States — and one of the few with an original first-order Fresnel lens to cast its light.

Sunset Glow on Bodie Island Lighthouse

Panorama from Currituck Beach Lighthouse

The Currituck Beach Lighthouse, Outer Banks, North Carolina, is open to visitors, who can climb the 220 steps to the top for unparalleled views of the Whalehead in Historic Corolla, the Currituck Sound, and the Atlantic Ocean.

Panorama from Currituck Beach Lighthouse

Currituck Beach Lighthouse

The Currituck Beach Lighthouse stands out for its distinctive red exterior. This design was intentional, to set the Currituck Lighthouse apart from its Outer Banks neighbors. After completion, the lighthouse was left unpainted, allowing visitors to marvel at the sheer number of bricks involved in its construction.

Currituck Beach Lighthouse

Currituck Beach Lighthouse Reflections

The Currituck Beach Lighthouse, located in the heart of Corolla, Outer Banks, North Carolina borders the historic Whalehead in Historic Corolla and still functions as a guide for passing mariners. At 162 feet tall, the lighthouse’s First Order Fresnel light, (the largest size available for American lighthouses), can be seen for 18 nautical miles as the light rotates in 20 second increments.

Currituck Beach Lighthouse Reflections

Walking Down the Pier

Walking down the pier towards Roanoke Marshes Lighthouse, Manteo, North Carolina. The Roanoke Marshes Lighthouse is open for visitors, and the interior features a series of exhibits that highlight the lighthouse and the area’s history, courtesy of the adjacent Roanoke Island Maritime Museum.

Walking Down the Pier

Roanoke Marshes Lighthouse at Dawn

The Roanoke Marshes Lighthouse is distinctive on the Outer Banks, as it is the only river lighthouse in Dare County. River lighthouses are much shorter and squatter than their coastal counterparts, and they were used to guard the entrances to inland rivers and harbors.

Roanoke Marshes Lighthouse at Dawn

Roanoke Marshes Lighthouse Before Dawn

The Roanoke Marshes lighthouse is often one of the most overlooked of the Outer Banks lighthouses, simply because of its small stature, limited visibility and remote location tucked away at the quiet east end of the Manteo (North Carolina) waterfront.

The current Roanoke Marshes Lighthouse, unlike its Outer Banks counterparts, it not an original. Instead, it is a replica of the original lighthouse that was constructed in 1877 at the southern entrance of the Croatan Sound in Wanchese, to help both passing sailors and local fishermen find their way to port. This lighthouse was actually the third to carry the name “Roanoke Marshes Light” as the first two, also constructed in the 1800s, were lost soon after they were constructed and put into service.

This scene was captured before dawn ….

Roanoke Marshes Lighthouse Before Dawn

Mattamuskeet Lighthouse

Mattamuskeet is often referred to as the “other” lighthouse, because that is how it is popularly known. In fact, Mattamuskeet is not truly a lighthouse: Mattamuskeet was originally a pump house, with it’s goal being to empty Lake Mattamuskeet, North Carolina.

With the purpose of draining the lake, the structure was built in 1915 as the world’s largest pumping station. When that project was scrapped, it became a hunting lodge in 1937. Now, the local landmark has been largely empty for more than three decades, since it closed to goose hunting in 1974. Yet preservationists are counting on the area’s natural beauty to generate interest in restoring the lodge.

Lake Mattamuskeet Lighthouse

Bodie Island Lighthouse

The current Bodie Island Lighthouse is the third that has stood in this vicinity of Bodie Island on the Outer Banks in North Carolina and was built in 1872. It stands 156 feet (48 m) tall and is located on the Roanoke Sound side of the first island that is part of the Cape Hatteras National Seashore. The lighthouse is just south of Nags Head, a few miles before Oregon Inlet.

Bodie Island Lighthouse

Bodie Island Lighthouse