Bench View from Shenandoah National Park

Shenandoah National Park extends along the Blue Ridge Mountains in the U.S. state of Virginia. The Skyline Drive runs its length, and a vast network of trails includes a section of the long-distance Appalachian Trail. Mostly forested, the park features wetlands, waterfalls and rocky peaks. Shenandoah is home to many bird species, plus deer, squirrels and the elusive black bear.

Bench View from Shenandoah National Park

Colonial Williamsburg Homes

The Colonial Willamsburg features restored homes from the 1700’s ….

Historic Home Colonial Willamsburg

St. George Tucker House

A lawyer, Revolutionary War militia officer, legal scholar, and judge, St. George Tucker brought three lots on Williamsburg’s Palace green from Edmund Randolph for £100 in 1788.

Colonial Williamsburg Home

Bassett Hall

A simple two-story 18th-century white frame farmhouse nestled on 585 acres of lawn, garden, and woodlands, Bassett Hall once was the Williamsburg home of John D. Rockefeller Jr. and his wife Abby Aldrich Rockefeller.

Colonial Williamsburg Courthouse

The Colonial Williamsburg Courthouse was constructed from 1770 to 1771 in the Georgian style. The courthouse once housed two separate court systems, one being the James City County Court, responsible for carrying out county cases, and the other, the Hustings Court, responsible for the city cases. The courthouse was built with red bricks with white wooden trim-boards and long arched windows with white shutters.

Colonial Williamsburg Courthouse

Colonial Williamsburg Courthouse

Bruton Parish Church in Colonial Williamsburg

Bruton Parish Church is located in the restored area of Colonial Williamsburg in Williamsburg, Virginia, USA. It was established in 1674 by the consolidation of two previous parishes in the Virginia Colony, and remains an active Episcopal parish.

Bruton Parish Church in Colonial Williamsburg

Bruton Parish Church in Colonial Williamsburg

 

Bruton Parish Church Colonial Williamsburg

Bruton Parish Church Colonial Williamsburg

Governor’s Palace Colonial Willamsburg

The Governor’s Palace in Williamsburg, Virginia was the official residence of the Royal Governors of the Colony of Virginia. It was also a home for two of Virginia’s post-colonial governors, Patrick Henry and Thomas Jefferson, until the capital was moved to Richmond in 1780, and with it the Governor’s residence. The main house burned down in 1781, though the outbuildings survived for some time after.

The Governor’s Palace was reconstructed in the 1930s on its original site. It is one of the two largest buildings at Colonial Williamsburg, the other being the Capitol

Governor's Palace Colonial Willamsburg

Governor’s Palace Colonial Willamsburg

 

Gateway to Governor's Palace Colonial Willamsburg

Gateway to Governor’s Palace Colonial Willamsburg