Slide to Digital – Japanese Cherry Blossoms

In Japan, spring is an occasion for social outings, serene walks in nature, and plenty of selfies taken next to cherry trees coated in candy-pink blossoms. Sakura matsuri, or cherry blossom festival, is recognized all over Japan in April — but with such a short bloom period, locals must make the most of the splendid show for as long as they can. Image circa 1985.

Japanese Cherry Blossoms

Slide to Digital – Traditional Japanese Architecture

Japanese architecture has traditionally been typified by wooden structures, elevated slightly off the ground, with tiled or thatched roofs. Sliding doors were used in place of walls, allowing the internal configuration of a space to be customized for different occasions. People usually sat on cushions or otherwise on the floor, traditionally; chairs and high tables were not widely used until the 20th century.

Image circa 1985.

Traditional Japanese Architecture

Slide to Digital – Religious Buildings

Buddhist temples are, together with Shinto shrines, considered to be among the most numerous, famous, and important religious buildings in Japan.

The architecture and features of Shinto shrines and Buddhist temples have melted together over the centuries. There are several construction styles, most of which show (Buddhist) influences from the Asian mainland.

Images circa 1985.

Slide to Digital – Golden Pavilion Kyoto

Kinkakuji (Golden Pavilion) is a Zen temple in northern Kyoto, Japan whose top two floors are completely covered in gold leaf. Formally known as Rokuonji, the temple was the retirement villa of the shogun Ashikaga Yoshimitsu, and according to his will became a Zen temple of the Rinzai sect after his death in 1408. Image circa 1985.

Golden Pavilion Kyoto