Savannah – Chippewa Square

Chippewa Square in Savannah, Georgia was designed in 1815 and named to commemorate the Battle of Chippewa in the War of 1812. In the center stands a bronze statue of the colony’s founder, General James Edward Oglethorpe, who faces south protecting Savannah from the Spanish in Florida. The Eastman-Stoddard House is a 12,000 sq ft Greek Revival Mansion which overlooks Chippewa Square. Although construction of this Greek revival mansion was started in 1844 for Moses Eastman, a local silversmith, it was not completed until 1847 for John Stoddard. 

Chippewa Square is also known as Forrest Gump Square, where the bus stop scenes from the Oscar winning motion picture were filmed on the north end of the square.

Savannah – Chippewa Square

Savannah – Wright Square

The original four squares (Johnson, Wright, Ellis, Telfair) of Savannah date to 1733 and were a distinctive part of James Oglethorpe’s plan for the city. Eventually squares were located in the center of each of the city’s 24 neighborhoods or “wards.” Savannah’s remaining 22 squares are located across a one-square-mile area of downtown. Each square is typically 200 feet north to south and 100 to 300 feet east to west.

Wright Square was designed in 1733 and named for Sir James Wright, Georgia’s third and last colonial governor. The monument in the square honors William Washington Gordon, an early mayor of Savannah who established the Central of Georgia Railroad. The large boulder marks the grave of Tomochichi, the Yamacraw Indian Chief who welcomed General Oglethorpe and the first colonists.

Savannah – Wright Square